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Month: April 2020

How To Make Your Audience Cry

If you are writing something absolutely devastating in your story, such as a heartbreak or death scene, it’s natural as a writer that you want to make your audience cry when it happens. If they cry, that means you have successfully connected with them in a way that is powerful enough to move them, which means your story is well written enough to connect with.

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Making Your Character’s Motivation Understandable

I’ve written before about how your Protagonist and your Antagonist both have to be motivated to go after what it is they want, but it’s important to remember that your audience has to understand why they want it. If they don’t understand why it matters, they’ll have a full disconnect with the character and stop caring if they achieve their goals.

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How To Write Characters Learning Information

If in your story you have a character that needs to learn a piece of information that is crucial to your story, you can have them learn it one of two ways. That can either learn it by working for it and finding it out because they’ve quested to accomplish that, or they can learn it by a chance because they hear another character discussing it or the stumble on it by mistake because of somebody else’s error.

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Writing Flowery Language

If you want to tell a story that focuses on plot and character, such as love story, action adventure, or murder mystery, and your audience come to you for those things, a detour to use a lot of flowery language and poetic description will get in the way. Your audience will stop reading because they’ve forgotten the point of the story and got bored.

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Writing Natural Dialogue

When you’re writing dialogue in your story, try and make sure it reads like people actually speak, rather than reading like it was written. Dialogue that reads like it’s artificial will make your characters feel artificial, and they’ll be harder to connect with on a human level. However, writing natural dialogue in a story, and writing natural dialogue to emulate real life, are different art forms.

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How To Write Character Back Story

Your character’s back story is their history and life prior to your jumping in point for this story. I’m going to be writing about how much back story you should give to your characters, how much you should make present in your plot, and how much you should pre-prepare rather than find out and fill in along the way according to what is useful to the story and character as you go.

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Writing Deaths Of Main Characters

If you’re writing a book or script where there is risk or peril, and you want your audience to believe in it and feel tense during scenes with fights or danger, you need to be willing to kill your main characters. But killing them needs to be done in a way that actually causes the sense of tension you need your audience to feel.

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How To Motivate Your Villains

When you’re writing a story, it’s obviously important to make sure your Protagonist is well motivated. However, if your Antagonist isn’t motivated equally, and exists solely to disrupt life for your Protagonist, your story will lack depth. Considering your Antagonist to be the Protagonist in their own story will mean you make your Antagonist an interesting and complex character, which in turn will improve the quality of your story.

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Writing Flawed Characters

When you write a story, quite often you’ll find that you will write your Protagonist to be an essentially “perfect” human. They don’t make mistakes, they don’t make bad decisions, they don’t do things wrong. Your Protagonist will interact with bad people and flawed people surrounding them, but they themselves are flawless. The problem is, if your main character is perfect, they’ll be boring, and they’ll be unrelatable.

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