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Category: Story Structure

Articles about how to structure your story.

How To Write Flashbacks

Using flashbacks is when you have two time lines, your main story line, and then a back story line in the past.

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Examples of Multiple Antagonists in one story

I’ve written before about the difference between the Protaognist and the Antagonist in your story and how you use them, but in some stories you’ll want to use multiple antagonists. I’ll give you some examples of how multiple antagonists can be used in one story, different kinds, and the effect it has, using one of my favourite films in the whole world as an example: Jurassic Park.

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Writing Description In Your Prose – How much is too much?

Writing effective and interesting prose is something we all have to work on to be good writers. Too much and it’s boring and tedious, too little and it’s too sparse and you don’t feel like you know the characters feelings or the environment they’re in well enough.

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How to write in a three act structure – SPOILERS – Die Hard

A three act structure is like a framework for your story, and is how you move your plot along in a controlled way that keeps your story organised and making sense. However, as with most things there is fluidity to it and if a three act structure doesn’t work for your story that’s okay, but if it does work, and it does help you, then this is a good guide on how to implement it and why you might want to.

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How to use an “Unreliable Narrator” – writing advice featuring The Girl On The Train

Most of the time when you go into reading a book or watching a film, there will be a person who’s telling you the story, it might be the lead character who’s POV you’re in, or an actual narrator. That’s usually a person who you trust is giving you an accurate account of the events occurring in your story. However, there is such a thing as an “unreliable narrator,” and I’ll be explaining how and why you might use an “unreliable narrator” by referencing the book The Girl On The Train by Paula Hawkins.

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Taking your characters from the mundane to the magical – advice for writing fantasy

Taking your characters from the mundane to the magical, a technique used in most fantasy stories, when you take your character from their normal life in their ordinary world that they’re familiar with, and into a magical world that’s new.

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