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Tag: story structure

Top Reasons Why Side Adventures Make Your Audience Stop Caring

Keeping your audience caring about this story, these characters, is essential. It means they’ll finish this story, then trust you enough to come back for more.

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How To Write A Conflict Engine For An Episodic Story

For a successful series, you need more than just the long form conflict. Something needs to happen each episode to tell a short mini story, a mini conflict. For this, you need a conflict engine. In this post, I’ll explore what one is, why it matters, and how to create one.

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How To Tell Your Audience What Your Story Is About

When your audience comes to your story, whether reading or watching, they won’t necessarily know what your story is about. They might have a blurb or a synopsis, but often that doesn’t tell them very much. I’m going to talk you through how to tell them quickly, and why it matters.

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Why Your Story Needs Foreshadowing And How To Write It

Foreshadowing is the technique of hinting to your audience where your story is going, without actually telling them. It works to make your story flow and feel planned and prepared, as well as making the end feel more satisfying. I will be writing how you do it.

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How To Write An Interesting Story Without Writing Info Dumps

Sometimes as part of your story, you’ll have information that needs to be delivered in order for the story to make sense. This could be rules of magical lore within your Universe, details of a quest your character goes on, world building about the environment they live in if you’re writing in high fantasy or sci fi, or politics of the time such as a war they’ve been engaged in or who is in charge. But, ultimately, either your audience, or both your character and your audience, need information to be delivered to them in order for you to tell your story.

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Examples of Multiple Antagonists in one story

I’ve written before about the difference between the Protaognist and the Antagonist in your story and how you use them, but in some stories you’ll want to use multiple antagonists. I’ll give you some examples of how multiple antagonists can be used in one story, different kinds, and the effect it has, using one of my favourite films in the whole world as an example: Jurassic Park.

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How to reward your audience for paying attention to your plot

When your reader or view is particularly observant and notices the small details in your story, you can reward them by making those small details pay off later in a way that is really satisfying. It takes time and effort, but it’s worth it.

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How To Write Multiple Protagonists

If you’re writing an ensemble cast, rather than just a single protagonist and antagonist, you may need to be able to write with multiple Protagonists, and understand what that means and how to do it well. However, an ensemble cast doesn’t necessarily mean you have multiple protagonists, you may have a large cast revolving around a single Protagonist. They’re only a Protagonist if you’re directly following their story.

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