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JJ Barnes

JJ Barnes writes about parenting, feminism, current affairs and writing

By - JJBarnes

Examples of Multiple Antagonists in one story

I’ve written before about the difference between the Protaognist and the Antagonist in your story and how you use them, but in some stories you’ll want to use multiple antagonists. I’ll give you some examples of how multiple antagonists can be used in one story, different kinds, and the effect it has, using one of my favourite films in the whole world as an example: Jurassic Park.

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By - JJBarnes

How to reward your audience for paying attention to your plot

When your reader or view is particularly observant and notices the small details in your story, you can reward them by making those small details pay off later in a way that is really satisfying. It takes time and effort, but it’s worth it.

By - JJBarnes

Writing a Non-Linear Story

Non-Linear storytelling is when you break up the chronological order of your story, and tell different sections at different times, so you’re writing in multiple timelines. There are different ways of writing a non-linear story, so I’ll a deep dive on the different styles in a future piece, but right now I’ll do an intro and cover a few different ways or writing non-linear.

By - JJBarnes

How To Write Multiple Protagonists

If you’re writing an ensemble cast, rather than just a single protagonist and antagonist, you may need to be able to write with multiple Protagonists, and understand what that means and how to do it well. However, an ensemble cast doesn’t necessarily mean you have multiple protagonists, you may have a large cast revolving around a single Protagonist. They’re only a Protagonist if you’re directly following their story.

By - JJBarnes

Writing The Death Of A Mentor – Story Structure and Characterisation Advice

The Death Of A Mentor is a technique used in story to motivate the Protagonist, by killing the person who has taught them to do what it is they do.

By - JJBarnes

Writing Your Midpoint – Story Structure Advice

Your first act is setting up what they want, the second act is where they start to pursue it, and the third act is where they’ve learned what they need to learn to go about getting it. Your midpoint comes at a point where your story pivots into a new setting or a new scenario.