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Tag: Storycraft

How To Write Foreshadowing

Foreshadowing is the technique of hinting to your audience where your story is going, without actually telling them. It works to make your story flow and feel planned and prepared, as well as making the end feel more satisfying. I will be writing how you do it.

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What Is A Good Prose To Dialogue Ratio?

If your book is too dialogue heavy, it can read like a script. You don’t get to know the environment your characters are in, or connect with their interiority in a way that you can relate to their emotions. However, if your book is too prose heavy, it can make it hard to get to know the characters because so much of how we ground ourselves in our characters is in how they communicate with each other. So, it’s important to strike a good prose to dialogue ratio.

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Writing Info Dumps

Sometimes as part of your story, you’ll have information that needs to be delivered in order for the story to make sense. This could be rules of magical lore within your Universe, details of a quest your character goes on, world building about the environment they live in if you’re writing in high fantasy or sci fi, or politics of the time such as a war they’ve been engaged in or who is in charge. But, ultimately, either your audience, or both your character and your audience, need information to be delivered to them in order for you to tell your story.

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Story Tellers and Cancel Culture

The concept of “cancelling” a human being has recently become very popular. You can be “cancelled” for all kinds of reasons, but usually it’s because you’ve expressed an opinion that is considered unsavoury, such as racism or homophobia. Sometimes it’s just because you follow somebody on Twitter who is deemed unsavoury. Perhaps you liked a tweet about something completely unrelated to the opinion that got someone “cancelled.” The variety of ways you can get “cancelled” is vast.

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Examples of Multiple Antagonists in one story

I’ve written before about the difference between the Protaognist and the Antagonist in your story and how you use them, but in some stories you’ll want to use multiple antagonists. I’ll give you some examples of how multiple antagonists can be used in one story, different kinds, and the effect it has, using one of my favourite films in the whole world as an example: Jurassic Park.

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How to reward your audience for paying attention to your plot

When your reader or view is particularly observant and notices the small details in your story, you can reward them by making those small details pay off later in a way that is really satisfying. It takes time and effort, but it’s worth it.

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How To Write Multiple Protagonists

If you’re writing an ensemble cast, rather than just a single protagonist and antagonist, you may need to be able to write with multiple Protagonists, and understand what that means and how to do it well. However, an ensemble cast doesn’t necessarily mean you have multiple protagonists, you may have a large cast revolving around a single Protagonist. They’re only a Protagonist if you’re directly following their story.

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Taking your characters from the mundane to the magical – advice for writing fantasy

Taking your characters from the mundane to the magical, a technique used in most fantasy stories, when you take your character from their normal life in their ordinary world that they’re familiar with, and into a magical world that’s new.

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